The Art of Chico Molo

 

When creating my work, it is important that I consider the objectives and its meaning. What's it trying to tell me? Where does it want to go? Is it coming from me, or is it created through me? Also, who, what and how does it change? The work should serve a higher purpose than my own ego.

 

Impressions

 

We look out at the world and we see a patchwork of shapes, textures and tones. Some are organic shapes, the structures of "Nature". Others are man-made shapes and forms, designed, manufactured and produced to feed the desires of our ever-growing "Cultures". My work looks at this relationship in the quest to find a balance. Within the work exist marks that represent both "Nature" and "Culture".

 

Mark-Making

 

As a printer, I am naturally drawn to marks that objects leave behind. In my work, I provide the right conditions for them to leave their marks, a metaphor for our own global carbon footprint.

 

Klimt-style portrait Klimt re-imagined Chico Molo's take on Klimt Re-inventing a classic Kiss part 1 Kiss part 2 Kiss part 3 Kiss, the final piece Nature Vs Culture 3 Nature Vs Culture 5 Nature Vs Culture 12 She Waits

Marks of Culture

 

The marks of Culture are created using found, recycled materials for the textures found on their surfaces. These objects are all around us and easy to find in anything man-made.

 

Marks of Nature

 

The Marks of Nature follow nature's own path; nature will find the most efficient, energy-saving way to replicate itself through fractalising structures and patterns, utilising and adapting to changing conditions in order for organic life to evolve and exist. The Marks of nature I find by using masking tape or tissue paper, representing ourselves as we are both "Culture" and "Nature", existing inside a skin of tissue.

The work is created by sharing autonomy with the process; I provide the outer perimeters for the compositions. The process provides the inner landscapes in the form of fractals.

 

Colour

 

Colours have their own life if we allow them to mix, blend and run into each other. To do this, I put away the brushes with their conventional and intentional form of application, and instead I searched for other ways to work and apply paint to the surface. Working wet is my answer, giving up the easel in favour of working on a flat surface.

 

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